Hyperion Siamese Twins • Gem Inclusion Pairs

by Lotus Gemology

Why should Hugh Hefner be the only one to enjoy twins? This special Hyperion Inclusion Gallery features images contained in the Lotus Gemology Hyperion Inclusion Database, but are shown as pairs so that one can directly compare details like changes in lighting and treatments.

It would be both an identical work of art only by virtue of its difference.
The same but different, he suggested, like twins.
Johnny Rich, The Human Script
	 Secondary "fingerprint" in a Mong Hsu (Myanmar) ruby before (left) and after heat treatment with flux. 	 Secondary "fingerprint" in a Mong Hsu (Myanmar) ruby before (left) and after heat treatment with flux.

Kashmir sapphires are unique in that the skin of many crystals feature deep blue spots of color, like spots on a leopard’s back (left). These are sometimes incorporated into finished stones, where they will be found just below the surface (right).

	 Secondary "fingerprint" in a Mong Hsu (Myanmar) ruby before (left) and after heat treatment with flux. 	 Secondary "fingerprint" in a Mong Hsu (Myanmar) ruby before (left) and after heat treatment with flux.

Secondary "fingerprint" in a Mong Hsu (Myanmar) ruby before (left) and after heat treatment with flux.

A lovely rosette inclusion surrounds a mica crystal in this ruby from Mozambique’s Montepuez region. This “rosette” actually consists of negative crystals flattened in the plane of basal pinacoid (perpendicular to the c axis). At left the rosette is seen with oblique fiber-optic lighting, while at right it is seen with dark field and oblique fiber-optic illumination. A lovely rosette inclusion surrounds a mica crystal in this ruby from Mozambique’s Montepuez region. This “rosette” actually consists of negative crystals flattened in the plane of basal pinacoid (perpendicular to the c axis). At left the rosette is seen with oblique fiber-optic lighting, while at right it is seen with dark field and oblique fiber-optic illumination.

A lovely rosette inclusion surrounds a mica crystal in this ruby from Mozambique’s Montepuez region. This “rosette” actually consists of negative crystals flattened in the plane of basal pinacoid (perpendicular to the c axis). At left the rosette is seen with oblique fiber-optic lighting, while at right it is seen with dark field and oblique fiber-optic illumination.

Mozambique silk before (left) and after (right) heat treatment. Note the breakdown of the daughter crystals after heating. Mozambique silk before (left) and after (right) heat treatment. Note the breakdown of the daughter crystals after heating.

Mozambique silk before (left) and after (right) heat treatment. Note the breakdown of the daughter crystals after heating.

Undissolved (left) vs. partially dissolved (right) rutile silk in sapphire. When a silk-bearing sapphire is heated at a high temperature, the titanium quickly moves into solid solution, while other impurities (such as iron) do not, leaving behind silk skeletons. Undissolved (left) vs. partially dissolved (right) rutile silk in sapphire. When a silk-bearing sapphire is heated at a high temperature, the titanium quickly moves into solid solution, while other impurities (such as iron) do not, leaving behind silk skeletons.

Undissolved (left) vs. partially dissolved (right) rutile silk in sapphire. When a silk-bearing sapphire is heated at a high temperature, the titanium quickly moves into solid solution, while other impurities (such as iron) do not, leaving behind silk skeletons.

Negative crystals can be seen in this untreated Mogok, Myanmar (Burma) sapphire in transmitted light (left). However, when illuminated with oblique fiber optic light, small exsolved plates become visible (right). Negative crystals can be seen in this untreated Mogok, Myanmar (Burma) sapphire in transmitted light (left). However, when illuminated with oblique fiber optic light, small exsolved plates become visible (right).

Negative crystals can be seen in this untreated Mogok, Myanmar (Burma) sapphire in transmitted light (left). However, when illuminated with oblique fiber optic light, small exsolved plates become visible (right).

These transparent crystals can be seen in transmitted light (left), and can be hard to distinguish from negative crystals. When observed between crossed polars (right), they reveal their doubly refractive nature in this untreated sapphire from Sri Lanka. These transparent crystals can be seen in transmitted light (left), and can be hard to distinguish from negative crystals. When observed between crossed polars (right), they reveal their doubly refractive nature in this untreated sapphire from Sri Lanka.

These transparent crystals can be seen in transmitted light (left), and can be hard to distinguish from negative crystals. When observed between crossed polars (right), they reveal their doubly refractive nature in this untreated sapphire from Sri Lanka.

With oblique fiber optic illumination (left) these primary rutile crystals in an untreated Madagascar ruby show a dark red appearance. However, with the addition of reflected light (right) we can also see that they display a submetallic luster where they were cut through on the surface. With oblique fiber optic illumination (left) these primary rutile crystals in an untreated Madagascar ruby show a dark red appearance. However, with the addition of reflected light (right) we can also see that they display a submetallic luster where they were cut through on the surface.

With oblique fiber optic illumination (left) these primary rutile crystals in an untreated Madagascar ruby show a dark red appearance. However, with the addition of reflected light (right) we can also see that they display a submetallic luster where they were cut through on the surface.

Mobile bubbles in negative crystals, as seen in this Madagascar ruby, cannot withstand heat treatment and thus are proof of natural origin. By gently tilting the stone we can distinguish the bubble from the frozen gas bubbles that are sometimes found in heat treated stones. Mobile bubbles in negative crystals, as seen in this Madagascar ruby, cannot withstand heat treatment and thus are proof of natural origin. By gently tilting the stone we can distinguish the bubble from the frozen gas bubbles that are sometimes found in heat treated stones.

Mobile bubbles in negative crystals, as seen in this Madagascar ruby, cannot withstand heat treatment and thus are proof of natural origin. By gently tilting the stone we can distinguish the bubble from the frozen gas bubbles that are sometimes found in heat treated stones.

	 Birefringent crystals light up in different colors in this sapphire from Sri Lanka as the polarizing filters are rotated. 	 Birefringent crystals light up in different colors in this sapphire from Sri Lanka as the polarizing filters are rotated.

Birefringent crystals light up in different colors in this sapphire from Sri Lanka as the polarizing filters are rotated.

 

Partially healed "fingerprint" in Sri Lankan sapphire, before (left) and after (right) heating. Heating causes tiny microfractures as the negative crystals burst, creating shiny discoid areas and a hazy appearance. Partially healed "fingerprint" in Sri Lankan sapphire, before (left) and after (right) heating. Heating causes tiny microfractures as the negative crystals burst, creating shiny discoid areas and a hazy appearance.

Partially healed "fingerprint" in Sri Lankan sapphire, before (left) and after (right) heating. Heating causes tiny microfractures as the negative crystals burst, creating shiny discoid areas and a hazy appearance.

 

 
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